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rigamarole


Here's the more common meaning: rigamarole is long, dull, overly complicated stuff in a procedure.

Less commonly, rigamarole is long, dull, pointless rambling in speech or writing.

Pronunciation:
RIG uh muh role

Part of speech:
Noun, usually the uncountable kind: "all that rigamarole," "this rigamarole."

Other forms:
You can use "rigamarole" as an adjective: "his rigamarole story," "her rigamarole style of speaking."

Here's a rare, alternate adjective: "rigmarolic."

And here's an obsolete noun that we should totally bring back: "rigmarolery."

Finally, there are tons of alternate forms of "rigamarole;" for example, an alternate spelling common in British English drops the first "a:" "rigmarole" (and the pronunciation, too, shortens to "RIG muh role").

How to use it:
When you're tired of phrases like "red tape," "jumping through hoops," and "bureaucratic nightmare," use the funny word "rigamarole," which helps you call attention to how a process is long, pointless, and ridiculous.

Often we use the phrase "the rigamarole of something:" the rigamarole of applying for a grant, the rigamarole of the Department of Motor Vehicles, the rigamarole of the club's induction ceremonies.

We can add an adjective: academic rigamarole, political rigamarole, gatekeeping rigamarole.

And often we just refer to "this rigamarole," "that rigamarole," "the office's rigamarole," etc.

examples:
In Modern Romance, Aziz Ansari contrasts the bygone tradition of marrying our neighbors with the present rigamarole of finding "the" "perfect" spouse.

"Don’t get me wrong — the proper sourcing of material is vital to research, but the rigamarole of punctuation and order is exasperating."



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