Adjective > Nameless

Something nameless is either

unnamed;

or, hard to remember the name for;

or, hard to describe in words;

or, not famous.

Part of speech:
adjective: “this nameless fear;” “the setting of the novel is nameless.”

Other forms:
namelessly, namelessness.

how to use it:
When you need to be clear and simple, “nameless” is a great alternative to clunkier words like “anonymous” and “inexpressible.”

It can sound poetic, too. Here’s Cormac McCarthy: “the gray and nameless day.” And here’s John Steinbeck: “He covered his eyes with his crossed arms and lay there a long time, and he was full of a nameless sorrow.”

You might talk about nameless fears and anxieties, nameless sins and nightmares, nameless workers and voters, nameless soldiers and heroes, nameless characters and narrators, etc.

examples:
The setting of the novel Trash is not India, and not Mexico, but a nameless country in deep poverty.

“When I drew nigh the nameless city I knew it was accursed.”
— H. P. Lovecraft, “The Nameless City,” 1921

“Losing his nights to cheap beer and the nameless heavy metal band setting up in the corner.”
— Bryan Bliss, We’ll Fly Away, 2018

“There was a time when it was legal to own people—and illegal for them to run away. Sometimes, society gets it wrong. And it’s not just nameless bureaucrats; it’s men like Thomas Jefferson.”
— Alvaro M. Bedoya, Slate, 7 November 2014